Littmann – Stethoscope Classic III S.E Raspberry – NSL 5626

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Riester – Stethoscope Black Edition Duplex is an acoustic medical device for auscultation, or listening to the internal sounds of an animal or human body. It typically has a small disc-shaped resonator that is placed against the chest, and two tubes connected to earpieces. It is often used to listen to lung and heart sounds. It is also used to listen to intestines and blood flow in arteries and veins. In combination with a sphygmomanometer, it is commonly used for measurements of blood pressure. Less commonly, “mechanic’s stethoscopes”, equipped with rod shaped chestpieces, are used to listen to internal sounds made by machines (for example, sounds and vibrations emitted by worn ball bearings), such as diagnosing a malfunctioning automobile engine by listening to the sounds of its internal parts. Stethoscopes can also be used to check scientific vacuum chambers for leaks, and for various other small-scale acoustic monitoring tasks. A stethoscope that intensifies auscultatory sounds is called phonendoscope.

Stethoscopes are often considered as a symbol of healthcare professionals, as various healthcare providers are often seen or depicted with stethoscopes hanging around their necks. A 2012 research paper claimed that the stethoscope, when compared to other medical equipment, had the highest positive impact on the perceived trustworthiness of the practitioner seen with it.[13]

The advent of practical, widespread portable ultrasonography (point-of-care ultrasonography) in the late 1990s to early 2000s led some physicians to ask how soon it would be before stethoscopes would become obsolete.[14] Others answered that they thought the relationship of the various tools (stethoscopes and digital devices) would change but that it would be a long time before stethoscopes were obsolete.[15] A decade later, in 2016, the same two sides of the coin were still recognized.[16] One cardiologist said, “the stethoscope is dead”, but a pediatrician said, “We are not at the place, and probably won’t be for a very long time”, where stethoscopes were obsolete. One consideration is that it depends on the segment of health care (emergency medical servicesnursingmedicine) and the specialty. “Stethoscopes retain their value for listening to lungs and bowels for clues of disease, experts agree.”[16] But for the cardiovascular system, “auscultation is superfluous”, one cardiologist said.[16]Thus, it could be that cardiology in the secondary and tertiary care settings may abandon the stethoscope many years before primary carepediatrics, and physical therapy do.